A while back I had a little fun comparing Agile to Rock’n’Roll. It’s still one of my favourite posts, and after my recent talk on the benefits of TDD, I got the idea that the best follow-up on that is something about the XP practices.

circles

Test Driven Development with Bonnie Riatt

The first artist that came up was Bonnie Riatt. This is mostly because Ron Jeffries has mentioned her a few times on the Scrum Development mailing list, and since that picture above is from his site, I figure I owe it to him. Oh, and it’s pretty good music!

She sings ‘I Will Not Be Broken', which is as good a summary of Test First development as one could wish for. And if you take into account lines such as ‘But I know where I’m not going', and ‘Pull me round; Push me to the limit’, then it’s perfectly clear we’re going through that TDD process cycle of Red, Green, Refactor in as small a steps as possible. Isn’t it?

Pair Programming with Aerosmith / The Beatles

I already mentioned ‘Come Together’ in the last post, and to be honest, I can’t think of a better Pair Programming song. It does bring with it some of the oft heard objections to pairing, with ‘Hold you in his arms till you can feel his disease’ being a succinct summary. These things have to be overcome, but you’ll end up with a classic that is covered by practically everyone. I’m going for the Aerosmith version, as their guitar work shows the advantages of having two great practitioners working together…

A great runner up was ‘Let Me Share The Ride', by The Black Crowes. All about how sharing the ride can be done with someone who isn’t a burden…

Refactoring with Eric Clapton

So how about Refactoring? Well, refactoring is all about removing duplication. There are many songs about duplicitive women and men, talking about how they’ve been done wrong, but apart from having a completely different meaning, I’d also have to save those for a special post about management practices. A much more suitable song is the classic ‘Double Trouble’ blues song, which you can see below in a marvellous version by Eric Clapton together with Steve Winwood. This song fits so well because it reminds the young programmer of the dangers that duplication in code brings. ‘I have no job, laid of and I’m having Double Trouble

Simple Design with The Ramones / The Doors

Simple Design is not simple to do. We all have a strong tendency to try to take into account all kind of possible future scenarios when writing code. So the advice that comes out of the The Doors song ‘Take it as it comes’ is very apt. I’ve selected a cover version by The Ramones here, but the central message is the same: “Take it easy baby, take it as it comes. Don’t move too fast if you want your love to last”;. Of course, read ‘code’ for ‘love’  there, but that should be automatic for any kind of real Craftsman…

Collective Code Ownership with The Red Hot Chili Peppers

Continuous Integration with Bruce Springsteen

Customer Tests with Led Zeppelin

Sustainable Pace with Queen